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10. Configuring the Bootloader

Content:

10.a. The MIPS PROM

MIPS doesn't require that you install a bootloader. The MIPS PROM handles the booting, but you need to install your kernel as a viable option.

First, install dvhtool, needed to copy the kernel to the SGI Volume Header.

Code Listing 1.1: Installing dvhtool

# emerge dvhtool

Now copy over the kernel to the SGI Volume Header. By default dvhtool assumes that the SGI Volume Header is on /dev/sda. If this is not the case (for instance when IRIX is installed on /dev/sda and Gentoo/MIPS on /dev/sdb) you need to inform dvhtool about it using -d <device>.

Code Listing 1.2: Copying a kernel to the SGI Volume Header

# dvhtool --unix-to-vh <kernel name in /boot> <name you want to give in volume header>

If you want to see all available entries in the volume, use --print-volume-directory:

Code Listing 1.3: Viewing all available entries in the volume

# dvhtool --print-volume-directory

To set up your system to boot Gentoo/MIPS you need to go tweak some settings in the MIPS PROM.

Continue with Rebooting the System.

10.b. Rebooting the System

Exit the chrooted environment and unmount all mounted partitions. Then type in that one magical command you have been waiting for: reboot.

Code Listing 2.1: Exiting the chroot, unmounting all partitions and rebooting

# exit
cdimage ~# cd
cdimage ~# umount /mnt/gentoo/boot /mnt/gentoo/proc /mnt/gentoo
cdimage ~# reboot

10.c. Tweaking the MIPS PROM

When you are rebooted, go to the System Maintenance Menu and select Enter Command Monitor (5). If you want to test your new Gentoo installation, you can just run boot -f <kernel name>. To have your system permanently boot into the Gentoo installation, you need to set some variables in the MIPS PROM:

Code Listing 3.1: Configuring the PROM to Boot Gentoo

1) Start System
2) Install System Software
3) Run Diagnostics
4) Recover System
5) Enter Command Monitor

Option? 5
Command Monitor.  Type "exit" to return to the menu.

(<root device> = Gentoo's root partition, e.g. /dev/sda3)
>> setenv OSLoadPartition <root device>

(To list the available kernels, type "ls")
>> setenv OSLoader <kernel name>
>> setenv OSLoadFilename <kernel name>

(Declare the kernel parameters you want to pass)
>> setenv OSLoadOptions <kernel parameters>

(Provide the location of the Volume Header)
>> setenv SystemPartition scsi(0)disk(1)rdisk(0)partition(8)

(Automatically boot Gentoo)
>> setenv AutoLoad Yes

(Set the timezone)
>> setenv TimeZone EST5EDT

(Use the serial console - graphic adapter users should have "g" instead of "d1" (one))
>> setenv console d1

Now you're ready to enjoy Gentoo! Boot in your Gentoo installation and finish up with Finalizing your Gentoo Installation.


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Page updated October 23, 2004

Summary: MIPS doesn't really have a bootloader, but the MIPS PROM is used to boot kernels instead. This chapter explains how to install your Linux kernel as a PROM boot option.

Sven Vermeulen
Author

Daniel Robbins
Author

Chris Houser
Author

Jerry Alexandratos
Author

Seemant Kulleen
Gentoo x86 Developer

Tavis Ormandy
Gentoo Alpha Developer

Jason Huebel
Gentoo AMD64 Developer

Guy Martin
Gentoo HPPA developer

Pieter Van den Abeele
Gentoo PPC developer

Joe Kallar
Gentoo SPARC developer

John P. Davis
Editor

Pierre-Henri Jondot
Editor

Eric Stockbridge
Editor

Rajiv Manglani
Editor

Jungmin Seo
Editor

Stoyan Zhekov
Editor

Jared Hudson
Editor

Colin Morey
Editor

Jorge Paulo
Editor

Carl Anderson
Editor

Jon Portnoy
Editor

Zack Gilburd
Editor

Jack Morgan
Editor

Benny Chuang
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Erwin
Editor

Joshua Kinard
Editor

Tobias Scherbaum
Editor

Grant Goodyear
Reviewer

Gerald J. Normandin Jr.
Reviewer

Donnie Berkholz
Reviewer

Ken Nowack
Reviewer

Lars Weiler
Contributor

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