Gentoo Logo
Gentoo Spaceship

Get Started
Gentoo Handbook
Downloads

News
Security Announcements
Calendar
Infrastructure Status

Documentation
Gentoo Handbook
Featured Documentation
IBM dW/Intel article archive

Get Gentoo
Downloads
Mirrors

Community
Discussion Forums
IRC Channels
Mailing Lists
Report Issues
Planet (Blogs)
Online Package Database
Wiki
Contact Us
Sponsors

Get Involved
Report Issues
Help Wanted
Help maintaining packages
Discussion Forums
IRC Channels
Mailing Lists
Become a Developer
Offer Resources
Enhancement Proposals (GLEPs)
Source Repositories
Developer's Manual

Other
Developer List
Developer Map
Gentoo Stores
Projects

About
About Gentoo
Philosophy
Social Contract
Name and Logo Guidelines
Logos and themes
Screenshots




1.  Gentoo Documentation Resources

Available Languages

Our documentation is also available in the following languages:

Czech | English | French | German | Italian | Japanese | Polish | Spanish

Gentoo Wiki

Please check out the Gentoo Wiki for documentation, guides, howto articles and other information.

Important: We are slowly moving our existing documentation to the Gentoo Wiki. If you do not find a document here that used to be listed, it is most likely integrated in the wiki, or already obsoleted by a wiki article.

2.  Gentoo Linux Documentation

  • Installation Related Resources
    • Installation Guides
      • Gentoo Handbook
        The Gentoo Handbook is an effort to centralise documentation into a coherent handbook. This handbook contains the installation instructions for internet-based installation approaches and parts about working with Gentoo and Portage.
      • Gentoo Linux x86 Quick Install Guide
        The Quick Install guide covers the Gentoo install process in a non-verbose manner. Its purpose is to allow users to perform a stage3 install in no time. Users should already have prior experience with installing Gentoo Linux if they want to follow this guide.
      • Gentoo Linux x86 with Software Raid and LVM2 Quick Install Guide
        The Quick Install guide covers the Gentoo install process in a non-verbose manner. Its purpose is to allow users to perform a stage3 install with software RAID and LVM2 in no time. Users should already have prior experience with installing Gentoo Linux if they want to follow this guide.
    • Other Installation Related Documentation
  • Gentoo Desktop Documentation Resources
    • Configuring your Desktop
      • Application Specific Documentation
    • Upgrade Guides
    • Gentoo System Documentation
      • Portage and Related Documentation
        • A Portage Introduction
          This chapter explains the "simple" steps a user definitely needs to know to maintain the software on his system.
        • Portage Features
          Discover the features Portage has, such as support for distributed compiling, ccache and more.
        • Working with Portage
          "Working with Portage" provides an in-depth coverage of Portage, Gentoo's Software Management Tool.
        • USE flags
          USE flags are a very important aspect of Gentoo. In this chapter, you learn to work with USE flags and understand how USE flags interact with your system.
        • Manually fixing broken portage installations
          This document attempts to help people to manually fix a broken sys-apps/portage installation.
        • Gentoo Overlays: Users' Guide
          This guide helps users understand how to use the Gentoo Overlays service.
      • Configuring Gentoo
        • Environment Variables
          With Gentoo you can easily manage the environment variables for your system. This chapter explains how you do that, and also describes frequently used variables.
        • Initscripts
          Gentoo uses a special initscript format which, amongst other features, allows dependency-driven decisions and virtual initscripts. This chapter explains all these aspects and explains how to deal with these scripts.
      • Gentoo Choices
    • System Administration Documentation
      • General System Administration
      • Specific Administration Guides
        • Gentoo Linux-VServer Howto
          In this Howto you will learn to setup a basic virtual server using the Linux-VServer Technology
        • Troubleshooting Apache
          This document covers a number of ways to figure out how to fix your Apache installation when things are not working correctly.
        • Upgrading Apache
          This document describes the procedure end-users should follow to safely upgrade their apache installation.
    • Gentoo Development Documentation
      • Gentoo Development Policies
      • Development Related Documentation
        • Gentoo Devmanual
          The Gentoo Devmanual is a technical manual for developers which covers topics such as writing ebuilds and eclasses, and also covers policies that developers should be abiding by.
        • Gentoo Developer Handbook
          This is the Gentoo Developer Handbook, a continuing effort to centralize development policies across Gentoo and to also outline Gentoo's development systems and procedures.
        • Gentoo GuideXML Guide
          This guide shows you how to compose web documentation using the new lightweight Gentoo GuideXML syntax. This syntax is the official format for Gentoo documentation, and this document itself was created using GuideXML. This guide assumes a basic working knowledge of XML and HTML.
        • Documentation Development Tips & Tricks
          Some tips & tricks that make the life for a Gentoo Documentation Developer easier
        • How to Install Gorg
          This guide describes how to install and configure gorg.
        • Apache Developer Documentation
          This document provides details about the eclasses available for developers of packages that relate to the Apache webserver.
        • Porting to Modular X HOWTO
          This guide shows you how to port packages to use the new modular X.Org.
    • Project Specific Documentation
      • Base Project Documentation
      • Developer Relations Documentation
        • Gentoo Developer Handbook
          This is the Gentoo Developer Handbook, a continuing effort to centralize development policies across Gentoo and to also outline Gentoo's development systems and procedures.
      • Documentation Project Documentation
        • Gentoo Linux Documentation Policy
          This document contains the Gentoo Documentation Policy, which is the base document which all Gentoo Documentation developers and Contributors should know and exercise.
        • Documentation Development Tips & Tricks
          Some tips & tricks that make the life for a Gentoo Documentation Developer easier
        • How to Install Gorg
          This guide describes how to install and configure gorg.
        • Translators Howto for Gentoo Documentation
          A frequently asked question is how to become a translator and what actions should be performed both to become one and to act as one. This document tries to explain all this.
        • Gentoo Metadoc XML Guide
          This guide informs developers how to use the Metadoc XML format that allows the Gentoo Documentation Project to keep its documentation in a hierarchical manner and allow more information to be stored about each document.
      • Infrastructure Project Documentation
        • Metastructure Project Documentation
          • Gentoo ProjectXML Guide
            This guide shows you how to create an official GuideXML page for a Gentoo Linux Project. The guide assumes a basic knowledge of the GuideXML format.
        • Public Relations Project Documentation
      • Published Articles
        • Gentoo Articles
          • Making the distribution, Part 1
            Each of us has a story to tell about our experiences with Linux. This is Daniel Robbins' Linux story. In this first of three articles, he talks about how he became a Stampede Linux developer, and why he eventually left Stampede to start his own distribution called Enoch.
          • Making the distribution, Part 2
            In his previous article, Daniel Robbins told the story of how he became a Stampede Linux developer and why he eventually left Stampede to start the Enoch Linux distribution. In this go-round he lets you in on the strange events that happened after the Enoch development team discovered a little-known, blazingly fast compiler.
          • Making the distribution, Part 3
            This article concludes his story -- about how he ended up creating his own distribution called Gentoo Linux. He wraps up the series by telling how he left the Linux world to move to FreeBSD, and then came back to the Linux world, restarting Gentoo Linux development with a fresh perspective. In addition to comparing Linux and FreeBSD in a number of areas, he also describe current Gentoo Linux development progress and share a future vision for the distribution.
        • Learning Linux Articles
          • Bash by example, Part 1
            By learning how to program in the bash scripting language, your day-to-day interaction with Linux will become more fun and productive, and you'll be able to build upon those standard UNIX constructs (like pipelines and redirection) that you already know and love. In this three-part series, Daniel Robbins will teach you how to program in bash by example. He'll cover the absolute basics (making this an excellent series for beginners) and bring in more advanced features as the series proceeds.
          • Bash by example, Part 2
            In his introductory article on bash, Daniel Robbins walked you through some of the scripting language's basic elements and reasons for using bash. In this, the second installment, Daniel picks up where he left off and looks at bash's basic constructs like conditional (if-then) statements, looping, and more.
          • Bash by example, Part 3
            In his final Bash by example article, Daniel Robbins takes a good look at the Gentoo Linux ebuild system, an excellent example of the power of bash. Step by step, he shows you how the ebuild system was implemented, and touches on many handy bash techniques and design strategies. By the end of the article, you'll have a good grasp of what's involved in producing a full-blown bash-based application, as well as a start at coding your own auto-build system.
          • LPI certification 101 (release 2) exam prep, Part 1
            In this tutorial, we'll introduce you to bash (the standard Linux shell), show you how to take full advantage of standard Linux commands like ls, cp, and mv, explain inodes and hard and symbolic links, and much more. By the end of this tutorial, you'll have a solid grounding in Linux fundamentals and will even be ready to begin learning some basic Linux system administration tasks.
          • LPI certification 101 (release 2) exam prep, Part 2
            In this tutorial, you will learn how to use regular expressions to search files for text patterns, how to locate files on your system, and how to take full control of Linux processes. You'll even get a whirlwind introduction to shell pipelines, redirection, and text processing commands. By the end of this tutorial, you'll have a solid grounding in basic Linux administration and will be ready to begin learning more advanced Linux system administration skills in the follow-on tutorial.
          • LPI certification 101 (release 2) exam prep, Part 3
            In this tutorial we'll introduce you the Linux system documentation. We will teach you how to change permissions and how to manage with Linux accounts. At the end you'll learn how to tune your enviroment.
          • LPI certification 101 (release 2) exam prep, Part 4
            In this tutorial, we'll introduce all popular filesystem on Linux. We'll teach you how to mount and unmount devices. In next chapter you'll know how to boot the system and how to work with runlevels. In next section of this tutorial, we'll introduce filesystem quotas, we will teach you how to set them and how to configure them. By the end of this tutorial you'll know a system logs.
          • Partitioning in action, Part 1
            In this new series of tips, Daniel Robbins shows you how to change partition layout on a running system. He'll also cover several tricks of the trade to minimize downtime and avoid making costly mistakes. In this particular tip, he'll show you how to move /home to another partition.
          • Partitioning in action, Part 2
            In this second tip on changing partition layout on a running system, Daniel Robbins shows you how to move /tmp and /var to their own shared partition. He also covers several tricks of the trade to minimize downtime and avoid making costly mistakes.
          • Partition planning tips
            Organizing your partitions correctly can be fun and rewarding. This collection of tips will help you to use those sectors wisely.
          • Maximum swappage
            Learn how to improve the swap performance on your Linux server by several orders of magnitude. Author Daniel Robbins takes you through this quick tip on getting the most from your server.
          • Learning Linux LVM, Part 1
            In this article, Daniel introduces you to the concepts behind Linux LVM (Logical Volume Management) and shows you how to get the latest kernel patches and tools installed on your system. LVM allows you to create logical volumes out of the physical storage resources on your machine. However, unlike physical volumes, the logical volumes can be expanded and shrunk while the system is still running, providing Linux system administrators with the storage flexibility that they've until now only dreamed of.
          • Learning Linux LVM, Part 2
            In this article, Daniel shares his experiences converting cvs.gentoo.org's /home filesystem to an LVM logical volume. After the transition, we get to see the benefits of LVM when cvs.gentoo.org's /home partition is dynamically resized in real-time, without rebooting, unmounting /home, or even dropping to runlevel 1. All processes continue to work without any interruption. Daniel's step-by-step details of the conversion will help anyone interested in peforming a similar transition on their own machine.
          • Software RAID in the new Linux 2.4 kernel, Part 1
            In his two-part series on the Linux 2.4 Software RAID, Daniel Robbins introduces the new technology that's used to increase disk performance and reliability by distributing data over multiple disks. This first installment covers Software RAID setup (kernel and tools installation) and shows you how to create linear and RAID-0 volumes.
          • Software RAID in the new Linux 2.4 kernel, Part 2
            In this two-part series, Daniel Robbins introduces you to Linux 2.4 Software RAID, a technology used to increase disk performance and reliability by distributing data over multiple disks. In this article, Daniel explains what software RAID-1, 4, and 5 can and cannot do for you and how you should approach the implementation of these RAID levels in a production environment. In the second half of the article, Daniel walks you through the simulation of a RAID-1 failed drive replacement.
          • Compiling the Linux kernel
            Daniel Robbins introduces the Linux kernel, and then walks you through locating and downloading sources, configuring the kernel, compiling and installing the kernel, and boot configuration.
          • Prompt magic
            Why stick with the standard boring shell prompt when you can easily make it colorful and more informative? In this tip, Daniel Robbins will show you how to get your shell prompt just the way you like it, as well as how to dynamically update your X terminal's title bar.
          • OpenSSH key management, Part 1
            In this series, you'll learn how RSA and DSA authentication work, and see how to set up passwordless authentication the right way. In the first article of the series, Daniel Robbins focuses on introducing the RSA and DSA authentication protocols and showing you how to get them working over the network.
          • OpenSSH key management, Part 2
            Many developers use the excellent OpenSSH as a secure, encrypted replacement for the venerable telnet and rsh commands. One of OpenSSH's more intriguing features is its ability to authenticate users using the RSA and DSA authentication protocols, which are based upon a pair of complementary numerical "keys". One of the main appeals of RSA and DSA authentication is the promise of being able to establish connections to remote systems without supplying a password. In this second article, Daniel introduces ssh-agent (a private key cache) and keychain, a special bash script designed to make key-based authentication incredibly convenient and flexible.
          • OpenSSH key management, Part 3
            In this third article in a series, Daniel Robbins shows you how to take advantage of OpenSSH agent connection forwarding to enhance security. He also shares recent improvements to the keychain shell script.
          • Advanced filesystem implementor's guide, Part 8
            With the 2.4 release of Linux come many new filesystem possibilities, including Reiserfs, XFS, GFS, and others. These filesystems sound cool, but what exactly can they do, what are they good at, and exactly how do you go about safely using them in a production Linux environment? Daniel Robbins answers these questions by showing you how to set up these new advanced filesystems under Linux 2.4. In this installment, Daniel continues his look at ext3, a new improved version of ext2 with journaling capabilities. He reveals all the inside information on ext3, and demonstrates some shockingly good ext3 data=journal interactive performance numbers.
        • DeveloperWorks Common Threads
          • Dynamic iptables firewalls
            Firewalls are good and fun, but what do you do when you need to make rapid, complex changes to your firewall rules? Easy. Use Daniel Robbins' dynamic firewall scripts that are demonstrated in this article. You can use these scripts to increase your network security and responsiveness, and to inspire your own creative designs.
          • Sed by example, Part 1
            In this series of articles, Daniel Robbins will show you how to use the very powerful (but often forgotten) UNIX stream editor, sed. Sed is an ideal tool for batch-editing files or for creating shell scripts to modify existing files in powerful ways.
          • Sed by example, Part 2
            Sed is a very powerful and compact text stream editor. In this article, the second in the series, Daniel shows you how to use sed to perform string substitution; create larger sed scripts; and use sed's append, insert, and change line commands.
          • Sed by example, Part 3
            In this conclusion of the sed series, Daniel Robbins gives you a true taste of the power of sed. After introducing a handful of essential sed scripts, he'll demonstrate some radical sed scripting by converting a Quicken .QIF file into a text-readable format. This conversion script is not only functional, it also serves as en excellent example of sed scripting power.
          • Awk by example, Part 1
            Awk is a very nice language with a very strange name. In this first article of a three-part series, Daniel Robbins will quickly get your awk programming skills up to speed. As the series progresses, more advanced topics will be covered, culminating with an advanced real-world awk application demo.
          • Awk by example, Part 2
            In this sequel to his previous intro to awk, Daniel Robbins continues to explore awk, a great language with a strange name. Daniel will show you how to handle multi-line records, use looping constructs, and create and use awk arrays. By the end of this article, you'll be well versed in a wide range of awk features, and you'll be ready to write your own powerful awk scripts.
          • Awk by example, Part 3
            In this conclusion to the awk series, Daniel introduces you to awk's important string functions, and then shows you how to write a complete checkbook-balancing program from scratch. Along the way, you'll learn how to write your own functions and use awk's multidimensional arrays. By the end of this article, you'll have even more awk experience, allowing you to create more powerful scripts.
          • POSIX threads explained, part 1
            POSIX (Portable Operating System Interface) threads are a great way to increase the responsiveness and performance of your code. In this series, Daniel Robbins shows you exactly how to use threads in your code. A lot of behind-the-scenes details are covered, so by the end of this series you'll really be ready to create your own multithreaded programs.
          • POSIX threads explained, part 2
            POSIX threads are a great way to increase the responsiveness and performance of your code. In this second article of a three-part series, Daniel Robbins shows you how to protect the integrity of shared data structures in your threaded code by using nifty little things called mutexes.
          • POSIX threads explained, part 3
            In this article, the last of a three-part series on POSIX threads, Daniel takes a good look at how to use condition variables. Condition variables are POSIX thread structures that allow you to "wake up" threads when certain conditions are met. You can think of them as a thread-safe form of signalling. Daniel wraps up the article by using all that you've learned so far to implement a multi-threaded work crew application.
          • Linux 2.4 stateful firewall design
            This tutorial shows you how to use netfilter to set up a powerful Linux stateful firewall.
          • Advanced Filesystem Implementor's Guide : Introducing ext3
            With the 2.4 release of Linux come a host of new filesystem possibilities, including Reiserfs, XFS, GFS, and others. These filesystems sound cool, but what exactly can they do, what are they good at, and exactly how do you go about safely using them in a production Linux environment? Daniel Robbins answers these questions by showing you how to set up these new advanced filesystems under Linux 2.4. In this installment, Daniel takes a look at ext3, a new improved version of ext2 with journaling capabilities.
          • Introduction to Samba, Part 1
            Samba is an incredible tool for anyone who uses both Unix and Windows. By implementing the SMB/CIFS protocol for Unix, Samba allows Unix systems to share their resources with standard Windows clients. In this introductory article, Daniel Robbins introduces you to what Samba can do. The focus will be on key concepts. (He'll step you through the setup process in his next article.) By the end of this article, you'll have a good understanding of what Samba does, and how it goes about doing it.
          • Introduction to Samba, Part 2
            In his previous article, Daniel introduced you to what Samba can do. Now it's time to get it running on your system. In this article, he'll walk you through the process of compiling, installing, and initially configuring Samba (version 2.0.7) so that it works in your environment.
          • Introduction to Samba, Part 3
            In his previous article, Daniel Robbins guided you through the process of setting up Samba for the first time. Now it's time to configure Samba so that it does everything that you want it to do.
          • The gentoo.org redesign, Part 1: A site reborn
            Have you ever woken up one morning and suddenly realized that your cute little personal development Web site isn't really that great? If so, you're in good company. In this series, Daniel Robbins shares his experiences as he redesigns the www.gentoo.org Web site using technologies like XML, XSLT, and Python. Along the way, you may find some excellent approaches to use for your next Web site redesign. In this article, Daniel creates a user-centric action plan and introduces pytext, an embedded Python interpreter.
          • The gentoo.org redesign, Part 2: A site reborn
            Have you ever woken up in the morning to the realization that your personal development Web site isn't really that great? If so, you're in good company. In this series, Daniel Robbins shares his experiences as he redesigns the www.gentoo.org Web site using technologies like XML, XSLT, and Python. Along the way, you may find some excellent approaches to use in your next Web site redesign. In this, the second installment, Daniel shows off the new documentation system and sets up a daily CVS-log mailing list.
          • The gentoo.org redesign, Part 3: A site reborn
            Have you ever woken up one morning and suddenly realized that your cute little personal development Web site isn't really that great? If so, you're in good company. In this series, Daniel Robbins shares his experiences as he redesigns the www.gentoo.org Web site using technologies like XML, XSLT, and Python. Along the way, you may find some excellent approaches to use for your next Web site redesign. In this installment, Daniel creates a new look for the site as a whole.
          • The gentoo.org redesign, Part 4: A site reborn
            Have you ever woken up one morning and suddenly realized that your cute little personal development Web site isn't really that great? If so, you're in good company. In this series, Daniel Robbins shares his experiences as he redesigns the Gentoo Linux Web site using technologies like XML, XSLT, and Python. This article: Daniel completes the conversion to XML/XSLT, fixes a host of Netscape 4.x browser compatibility bugs, and adds an auto-generated XML Changelog to the site.
        • Miscellaneous Articles
          • Best practices with autotools
            This article covers some of the most common errors people make when using autotools and ways to achieve better results.
          • Linux hardware stability guide, Part 1
            In this article, Daniel Robbins shows you how to diagnose and fix CPU flakiness, as well as how to test your RAM for defects. By the end of this article, you'll have the skills to ensure that your Linux system is as stable as it possibly can be.
          • Linux hardware stability guide, Part 2
            In this article, Daniel Robbins shares his experiences in getting his NVIDIA TNT graphics card working under Linux using NVIDIA's accelerated drivers. As he does, he'll show you how to diagnose and fix IRQ and PCI latency timer issues -- techniques you can use to ensure that your systems don't experience lock-ups, inconsistent behavior, or data loss.
      • Other Documentation


      Page updated October 19, 2014

      Donate to support our development efforts.

      Copyright 2001-2014 Gentoo Foundation, Inc. Questions, Comments? Contact us.